“P.S. From Paris” by Mark Levy – Kindle Edition

P.S. From Paris was my August Kindle First selection. Amazon Prime members get access to one free book one month before it becomes available for purchase. I am glad that I read it. However, there are a few caveats.

Characters – Characters in P.S. From Paris are well-fleshed out with a few being less-so. I quickly grew fond of most characters. The banter between the main characters especially is worth the price of admission.

Content – There is nothing particularly egregious in this story. The language is tame overall, with maybe a dozen mostly mild expletives. There is no violence. There are allusions to adult relations that are not much steamier than the old film trope of having the camera pan away from a kissing couple. I like the overall wholesome feel.

Pacing – One of the major detractions from the book for me was the pacing. The beginning seemed slow. I had to fight to stay awake. The pace picked up and never wavered again once the romantic leads met one another.

Storyline – This is a romance, certainly. Some have labeled it rom-com. For me, there are comic moments, but they are the sort that made me smile wryly, rather than laugh out loud. This book was light-hearted the first 85% or more of the novel, then become melodramatic and serious in content and tone near the end.

This evolving plot is something I have seen a lot lately. It tends to feel a bit contrived– like the author is trying too hard to be clever, relevant, and socio-politically vital. This story is slightly less heavy-handed about it than others I have read lately.

It is not that I object to profound messages in books that I read– quite the opposite! It is more a matter of feeling that there is depth to be found in the simplest of stories, too. To me, it does not need switching gears to make it into something unexpected. When done with mastery, precision, and subtlety, I am sure it would make a winning story for me. I have seen it so often that I am starting to expect it beforehand.

I am also unclear how realistic the plot twist is, as it seems beyond all credulity that the publishing deception went undiscovered for years. [It is too difficult to detail this further without spoiling the plot for readers].

Writing – Marc Levy writes well. The story is often enjoyable to read. A slight problem with following the story comes down to dialogue. Mr. Levy kept a minimalistic approach to attributing lines of dialogue. It became hard to follow without reading back and making sure of the speaker. There were also several instances of a change in the scene without much fanfare. It took a minute to sort out what was happening.

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